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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

4 edition of Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens interpretive quips (IQs) found in the catalog.

Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens interpretive quips (IQs)

Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens interpretive quips (IQs)

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  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Directorate of Compliance Programs in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bloodborne pathogens -- United States -- Prevention,
  • Occupational diseases -- United States -- Prevention,
  • Medical personnel -- Protection -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsUnited States. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Directorate of Compliance Programs.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v. (varous pagings)
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18675075M
    OCLC/WorldCa33216027

    The purpose of this document is to comply with OSHA's Occupational Exposures to Bloodborne Pathogens in Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations and as revised in by the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act P.L. The intent of this exposure control plan is to prevent bloodborne infections. AIDS - Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome BBP - Bloodborne Pathogens ECP - Exposure Control Plan EHSO - Environmental Health and Safety Offices HBV - Hepatitis B Virus HBvac - Hepatitis B Virus vaccination HIV - Human Immunodeficiency Virus IDC - Interdepartmental Charge LPO - Limited Purchase Order OPIM - Other Potentially Infectious Materials OSHA - Occupational Safety and .

    OSHA Training Requirements - Bloodborne Pathogens. This website is not the official or final authority to determine OSHA compliance responsibilities, which are set forth in OSHA standards themselves, and the Occupational Safety and Health Act of A companion booklet, A Best Practices Approach for Reducing Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure, is also available from Cal/OSHA. It provides a practical, step-by-step approach to addressing occupational bloodborne pathogens exposure. This booklet can help with: • Identifying and Selecting Appropriate and Effective Engineering Controls.

    WSU Guidelines for Bloodborne Pathogen Occupational Exposure Management / Medical Services Rev3/26/ Immediate Actions Wash: For punctures or lacerations, bleed the site well under running water and wash with soap and water. For mucous membrane splashes (eyes, nose or mouth), immediately flush with copious amounts of water. Bloodborne Pathogen standard (29 CFR ) and is based on the concept of universal or standard precautions. Employees who have a reasonably anticipated occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens must become knowledgeable in the applicable details of this plan and fulfill their responsibilities as outlined.


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Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens interpretive quips (IQs) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Health care personnel are at risk for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens — pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following a specific exposure, the risk of infection.

Get this from a library. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Directorate of Compliance Programs: occupational exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Interpretive Quips (IQs).

[United States. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Directorate of Compliance Programs.]. Get this from a library. Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens interpretive quips (IQs). [United States. Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Directorate of Compliance Programs.;]. minimizes its employees’ occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens as much as possible. Universal Precautions In our business, which includes all off-site work locations, as well as the shop, [company name] has begun the practice of “universal precautions.” As a result, all human bloodFile Size: KB.

OSHA Guidelines for Compliance in Healthcare Facilities addresses the OSHA standard for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens, with emphasis on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis viruses.

Procedures OSHA requires for compliance with the standard - engineering controls, general work practices, personal protective clothing/equipment, staff education 4/5(1). Enforcement Procedures for the Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens.

Information Date: 11/27/ Standard Number: This directive is currently only available in: PDF. Department of Labor logo. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Occupational Safety & Health Administration. Disclaimer. The information contained is this document is not considered a substitute for any provisions of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of (OSH Act) or the requirements of 29 CFROccupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens.

Federal/State OSHA Authority. Federal OSHA authority extends to all private sector employers with one or more employees, as well. Part 1 Bloodborne Pathogens Standard The following model for an Exposure Control Plan includes all elements required by the OSHA bloodborne pathogens standard (29 CFR ).

The intent of this model is to provide employers with an easy-to-use format that may be used as a template to develop a written exposure control plan tailored to the. National rapid response for HIV management and bloodborne pathogen exposures. Consultation and answers on post-exposure management.

Page last reviewed: April 7, Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Workplace Safety & Health Topics.

Bloodborne Infectious Diseases (HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis B & C). Final Rule on Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens. Abstract: OSHA is promulgating a standard to eliminate or minimize occupational exposure to Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and other bloodborne pathogens.

The standard will become effective on 3/6/ Based on a review of the information in the rulemaking. After doing a number of studies the CDC has concluded that million workers in the health care industry and related occupations are at risk of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

million is a lot of people. In the United States there are 5, registered hospitals according to the American Hospitals Association. This is not a comprehensive list of occupations where the employees may have occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), “occupational exposure means reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious.

A 5-year surveillance of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens in a university teaching hospital in Monterrey, Mexico.

American Journal of Infection Control, 41 (9), ee CDC. Recommendations for prevention of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus to patients during exposure-prone procedures. How Do Bloodborne Pathogens Spread in the Workplace. The most common ways bloodborne pathogens spread are through sexual transmission or IV drug use.

However, any contact with infected blood or body fluids carries the risk of potential infection. With the correct information, irrational fears about workplace exposure to HIV and HBV can be.

The following model for an exposure control plan includes all elements required by the OSHA Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR ). The intent of this model is to provide your council/camp with an easy-to-use format that may be used as a template to develop a written exposure control plan tailored to the.

Explain why transmission of bloodborne pathogens is still a critical occupational health issue 2. Provide recent sharps injury and mucocutaneous exposure data 3.

Review OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard requirements I. General Requirements II. Applied Requirements, including Recordkeeping and Medical Records 4. Occupational Bloodborne Pathogen Exposures A significant number of employees are at risk of occupational exposure to human blood and other body fluids containing microorganisms that can cause disease in humans.

The most common pathogens of concern are the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV).

General Resources on Bloodborne Pathogens. OSHA Regulations: Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR ) External Provides information on OSHA standards, hazard recognition, post-exposure evaluation, more. Information for Employers, Complying with OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens Standard DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No.Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens WAC Scope This chapter provides requirements to protect employees from exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) that may contain bloodborne pathogens.

Examples of bloodborne pathogens are the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. All occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) place workers at risk for infection with bloodborne pathogens.

This course is designed for individuals who require bloodborne pathogens training, but are not required to develop or manage their exposure control plan. Read and understand your employer’s Exposure Control Plan.

Dispose of used sharps promptly into an appropriate sharps disposal container. Use sharps devices with safety features whenever possible. Use personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves and face shields, every time there is a potential for exposure to blood or body fluids.This course is designed to provide students with the necessary knowledge to help reduce or eliminate the occupational risk of bloodborne pathogens in various healthcare settings.

The goal of this course is to help students understand the risks and develop behaviors to help protect them when exposed to potentially infectious materials, such as. Bloodborne pathogens are tiny microorganisms found in human blood or other bodily fluids that can cause diseases in humans.

Controlling our exposure to bloodborne pathogens can prevent these diseases and save lives. That is the point of our facility’s Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Program and that is the point of this program.